South Sudan

OVERVIEW

South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July 2011 following a referendum in which 99 per cent of the South Sudanese population voted for independence. Due to simmering political and ethnic tensions in the two year old country, violence erupted, plunging the new state into a protracted civil war. Both the government and rebel forces have been accused of human rights violations, including widespread and systematic sexual violence and allegations of ethnic cleansing and potential genocide. Intermittent peace negotiations have occurred, during which women have and continue to be excluded from formal negotiations. However women have been vocal about their inclusion in the national peace process through informal tracks, as well as delivering grassroots peacebuilding initiatives. Nevertheless, women’s participation is constrained by a combination of poverty, discriminatory cultural practices such as child, early and forced marriage (CEFM), lack of education, confidence, capacity and literacy, care burdens and reproductive responsibilities, and negative labelling and sexualisation of politically active women. A deteriorating economy, mass displacement and climatic shocks have intensified food insecurity and famine which disproportionately affects women, increasing insecurities and vulnerabilities

STRENGTH OF GENDER PROVISIONS

Joint Final Communique and Resolutions: Dinka Malual and Messiriya Grassroots Peace

0
None
1
Weakest
2 3 4 5
Strongest
Human Rights
Development  
Post-Conflict Issues  
Violence Against Women
Participation  
General

The Transitional Constitution of Southern Sudan

0
None
1
Weakest
2 3 4 5
Strongest
Human Rights
Development
Post-Conflict Issues
Violence Against Women
Participation
General

Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan 2015

0
None
1
Weakest
2 3 4 5
Strongest
Human Rights  
Development  
Post-Conflict Issues  
Violence Against Women  
Participation  
General

WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION:
KEY CONSTRAINTS AND ENABLERS

Constraints

  1. Ongoing civil war, violence and human rights violations
  2. Humanitarian crises (e.g. famine and food insecurity, poverty, mass displacement)
  3. Intersection of CEFM and families’ economic survival

Enablers

  1. Strong women’s civil society
  2. Changes in gender relations and gendered division of labour due to conflict (e.g. changes in land access)